University Career Center

Upcoming LiveWorkDetroit Networking Event

Many young professionals don't necessarily think of Detroit as a place to launch their careers, but the city is growing and so too are career opportunities in a number of industries like high-tech start-ups, medical research, fashion and art, and business. If you want to learn more about Detroit, network with employers growing their businesses in the city, and have some fun in the city register for the upcoming LiveWorkDetroit event taking place March 28 from 2:00 to 8:00 PM in the newly renovated Gardent Theatre. 

View of Detroit

Advice from Alumni: Networking 101

Want to network like a pro? UM Alumna Jessica Kaufman has some advice to help you get started. 

Networking 101: A simple guide to getting a job and expanding your network through social media.

Jessica Kaufman photo

WolverineDocs Network/UCAN

WolverineDocs is a long standing network sponsored by the University of Michigan University Career Center. The goal of the network is to facilitate communication between UM pre-medical students and alumni/ae who are either currently enrolled in medical school or have recently graduated from it--both allopathic and osteopathic.  WolverineDocs agree to speak about their medical school with UM students and graduates, sharing precious insights on their experience at their particular institution.


Networking Resources

Use the following resources to become an expert at "networking":

Overview

When you hear “You should be networking...” do you recoil and think:

  • I don’t like 'Shmoozing'
  • I have to know someone and I don’t
  • I am not an extrovert
  • Add your excuse for not doing this very important job search activity HERE

Let us reintroduce you this vital piece of your job search and rename it: Networking is Building Community

It is a way to build a community of professionals that you know. The good news is that you do know people and we can help you figure out how to find more people. Building a professional community can help you in the following ways:

  • Career definition. Networking helps you to get to know who you are professionally and how your story connects to their work.
  • Find the hidden job market. Did you know most jobs (about 80%) are not found from job postings? Many people know about potential openings that either have not been posted yet or have been posted in a place you did not look.
  • Practice your interviewing skills. You can do this by talking to a professional about your professional interests without the pressure of a job interview.

Informational graphic about Informational Interviews

Prepare Your "Presentation"

Getting Started: Prepare Your Presentation

  • Develop a quick way (we’re talking 30 seconds here) to introduce yourself to someone. This is often called an Elevator Speech, or a 30-second commercial of who you are and what you'd like to do professionally. Your story should tell a logical path of your past experiences, including why you did them, culminating in why you reached out to the person.

  • Have business cards made to share with a contact. Did you know students can order FREE business cards from the Alumni Association?

  • Prepare a resume to share with the professionals you contact to provide background information and to get their advice. Here's some of our own tips about resumes.

  • Make a list of questions that you want to ask a professional contact. You should plan to conduct the conversation when you meet or talk with a networking contact -- you are interviewing them for information about what they do and insights they may have to their job or profession.  See the Informational Interview questions to help you get started.   Here's our own list to get you started.

Identify People To Build Your Professional Community

Consider who you may already know:

  • List names of current and former colleagues, acquaintances from professional/campus organizations, and the business associates of family and friends.
  • Don’t forgot your personal network—neighbors, relatives, organizations, religious or community groups, clubs, or volunteer groups. Look to all generations for building a professional community.
  • Fill in the gaps by reconnecting with old acquaintances, getting involved in the committees of your favorite organization, or volunteering.
  • And don't forget U-M alumni! Use UCAN (our new University Career Alumni Network) to search and connect with U-M alumni who have volunteered to chat with current students about all things career-related!

Getting Started on LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great resource for students looking for an additional edge as they network and job search. It’s easy to sign up for an account, but new users often get stuck asking "what next"? Simply having an account isn’t enough, so here are a few tips for students on getting started with LinkedIn:


Informational interviewing

Networking Using Informational Interviews

One of the best ways to learn about career and potential job prospects is to talk with individuals currently working in that field.  This is called “informational interviewing.”  An informational interview may be conducted in person or via phone to help you gain knowledge about a field of choice. Whether you are still exploring and want to learn more basic information about a particular field, or if you have decided on a field or occupation and you are looking for tips on job searching--an informational interview is a fantastic resource.


Preparing your presentation

Getting Started: Prepare Your Presentation

  • Develop a quick way (we’re talking 30 seconds here) to introduce yourself to someone. This is often called an Elevator Speech, or a 30-second commercial of who you are and what you'd like to do professionally. Take from your story what you think is relevant to the person you are speaking to.

  • Have business cards made to share with a contact. Did you know students can order FREE business cards from the Alumni Association?